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Under The Influence 2014

Editorial design

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Harry has been appointed Design Director and Consulting Editor of Under The Influence. For his first issue, number 13, the London-based, independently published magazine has been completely redesigned, including a new masthead and bespoke headline typeface.

The 276 large format pages include the contributions of Kristen McMenamy, Nadav Kander, Chris Dercon, Paul Smith, Jonathan Porritt, Quentin Blake, Guerrilla Girls, Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Clare Shilland, Ronald Dick, Andrew Vowles, Greta Ilieva, Guerrilla Girls, Mitch Epstein, Daniel Johnston and Ossian Ward, amongst others.

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The Sculpture of Bill Woodrow 2013

Book Design

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This 224 page book is the first comprehensive study of the sculptural work of British artist Bill Woodrow, and provides a full visual survey of his work from the late 1960s to the present. A fully illustrated text looks closely at the career and oeuvre of the artist and its critical reception, moving between Woodrow's own accounts of his work and a rich variety of responses by art writers and historians. The book includes numerous previously unpublished photographs and full reference material, drawing for the first time on Woodrow's own extensive archive.

With the design we referenced the physical forms of Woodrow's cut-out work, by making smaller images force indents into the body text, with the captions becoming 'umbilical cords' between the two; for the cover and chapter divider spreads we introduced colour overlays over photographs, to create striking recontextualisions of the artworks.

The book is published by Lund Humphries and can be purchased directly from them here.

Designed in collaboration with Ben Weaver.

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Kitty McKibbin 2013

Identity design

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Kitty McKibbin is a London based interior designer who wanted a very simple identity and key pieces of stationery.

Index of projects

V&A Discovering Architecture 2013

Book / Educational Design

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London's world-famous Victoria & Albert Museum has an outstanding educational department, working on diverse programmes to inspire families and young people during their visits to the site. The Discovering Architecture guide forms the centrepiece of the latest of the V&A’s line of award-winning family back-packs, which are full of hands-on activities, including jigsaws, stories, puzzles and construction games. This is the first in the series to go beyond exploration of the Museum’s collection as it also encourages children to think about the building and the variety of spaces they can discover.

The Discovering Architecture Back-pack is designed for children aged 7+ and our sturdy wire bound book guides families on a journey to learn about the work of architects through drawings, colour, connecting spaces, light and materials, and finally construct a model and design their own building. The motifs of traditional architect's tools such as a set square, protractor and folding ruler create a visual path echoing the users' journey through the building itself.

The back-pack and guide book were developed with Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners.

Child photo © Lucy Goodayle 2013

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Tina Kandelaki 2013

Identity design / Art direction

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Georgian-born and Moscow-based, businesswoman, TV presenter and all-round influential Russian, Tina Kandelaki, asked us to create a personal brand to represent her in all future activities. We accepted the challenge and designed a dual-language logotype, identity system and extensive brand book.

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Unpackaged 2013

Identity / Retail Design / Interior Design

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Unpackaged is a London café, bar and grocery, selling the majority of its products without packaging. After giving shape to their first incarnation in 2007, we were commissioned to design their new, larger 160m2 space in Hackney, with a very small budget and an (as far as possible) eco build.

Our visual keys were a utilitarian 1950s pre-supermarket era of local grocers and busy high streets; coupled with Mediterranean café influences, inspired by the Spanish food and wine at the core of chef Kate de Syllas’ menu. This is manifested in our palette of rich ochre, inky and duck-egg blues, dusky coral with more vibrant tomato red, sunflower yellow and turmeric.

Three primary materials were used: Marmoleum for the ziggurat patterned floor, marble off-cuts for the bar and counter tops, and pegboard for the walls and wheeled room dividers. These create abstracted booths and visual breaks between the 40+ seats and tables, bringing intimacy to the originally quite cavernous space. A motley crew of salvaged and collected chairs and stools were stripped and painted black, creating unison and an informal texture to the landscape of the space.

Without the budget to physically alter such a large and awkward façade, we decided to embrace the strange grid of windows and multiple doors, creating a bespoke typeface which expands and contracts to fill each window unit, with a condensed version used throughout the shop for signage and labelling. The original jar logo has been updated and is joined by a wine glass, knife and fork and coffee cup.

Photos by Joe Clark

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Digital Crystal: Swarovski at the Design Museum 2012

Identity / Graphic Design / Exhibition Design

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Exhibited at London's Design Museum, Digital Crystal showcased 15 of Swarovski’s design and architecture commissions from the last 10 years. These installations have served as an experimental platform for leading figures in international design to conceptualise, develop and share their most radical works.

Working closely with designer Roland Ellis, we created a two metre square title sign resembling flashing neon words hand encrusted with hundreds of crystals. We wanted to avoid the usual connotations of sparkly crystals, so the back-lit crystals become almost monochromatic — each facet highlighted tonally.

To complement architects Carmody Groarke's semi-opaque structures — as well as the optical properties of Swarovski's crystals — our caption and information system used back-lit panels of transparent acrylic, reverse printed in white, with titles laser-cut out. They appeared to float within the ethereal exhibition space.

The marketing materials used a simplified graphic version of the title signage, with an animated lenticular print for the opening party's invitation.

The show featured artworks by Ron Arad, Yves Béhar, Paul Cocksedge, Troika, Anton Alvarez and Hilda Hellström, amongst others.

Photos by Peer Lindgreen

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High Hat 2012

Identity / Art Direction

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Identity and promotional design for an ongoing series of London club nights. In collaboration with illustrator James Graham. Animation by Bill Porter.

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Inside: World Festival of Interiors 2011

Branding / Art Direction / Exhibition

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November 2011 saw Barcelona's CCIB centre host the inaugural Inside: World Festival of Interiors. The event, centred around an awards programme, allows the world's best interior designers and architects to present their work live to both their peers and a highly regarded super-jury. Multistorey were commissioned to act as festival art directors, creating the visual identity system and all related designs and applications, including many press and online adverts, printed collateral and a 64 page newsprint catalogue. The exhibition was designed in collaboration with Matt Edmonds of Frank, who used powder coated steel mesh and printed cardboard boxes to divide and organise the 1600 square metre banqueting hall.
insidefestival.com

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Toto / Love Japan 2011

Branding / Graphic Design

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During 2011’s Clerkenwell Design Week, Japanese bathroom manufacturer Toto hosted Love Japan, a charity auction in their London showroom to raise money for Shigeru Ban Architects’ evacuation centre project, which helps displaced survivors of the Japanese earthquake disaster. The donated items sold were all interior products by Japanese designers.

We were commissioned to create the identity and catalogue for the event, alongside web banners and an e-invitation, all within a tiny budget. The red circle obviously represents the people of Japan, with the loosely sketched chair being the design community supporting them. A very lightweight stock was specified for the 2 colour, A2 folding to A5 catalogue, as it was very noticably 'paper', evoking both the traditional architecture of Japan and the paper based work of Shigeru Ban.

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Design Museum Brit Insurance Designs of the Year 2010

Exhibition Graphics / Art Direction / Graphic Design

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In 2011 Multistorey worked with Robert Green to design the graphic elements of the Brit Insurance Designs of the Year exhibition at London's Design Museum, featuring the year's highlights from all the design disciplines. Working within fairly rigid brand guidelines, our design remit included all signage, wayfaring and captioning within the exhibition space, the accompanying catalogue, invitations and screen-based marketing material.

Working alongside David Kohn Architects, our aim was to cohesively integrate the spatial, structural and graphic elements of the show. DKA's elegant cubic plinth system created a visually lightweight, undulating landscape that flowed invitingly around the gallery. To offset the neutral tones and rigidity of the wire-frame-like structure, we created large fabric banners that were slung over a network of high tensile wires suspended from the ceiling. The vibrant canvases were painstakingly hand-printed, and accompanied by hook-on credit tabs, constructed from printed linen traditionally bookbound onto their rigid core. This texture was carried onto the plinth tops and the printed material, creating a tactile link to all elements.

We created and photographed an abstracted miniature model of the cubic display system, to be used in various formations for the catalogue covers and dividers, and as a playful backdrop to the typography. The logotype and font were overhauled to more closely echo the Design Museum's branding.

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Freddie Merckx / Feed My Ride 2011

Bag Design

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This printed bag is part of Feed My Ride, a cycle advocacy project organised by Progress Packaging. The 'musette' bags were once standard in bike shops and are used in professional racing for the riders to carry food. 15 studios were asked to contribute designs, with ours being a juvenile mélange of Freddie Mercury and Eddy Merckx. Their names sound similar, and it makes for a funny picture. There is no deeper meaning.

Buy it here

Index of projects

Darkroom 2009

Branding / Interiors / Retail / Art Direction

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Darkroom, launched in late 2009 by Multistorey director, Rhonda Drakeford and Lulu Roper-Caldbeck, is a London concept store specialising in unusual, one-off and hand-made men's, women's and interior accessories.

Multistorey have designed all elements of the store including identity, signage, shop-fit, marketing materials, website and packaging. Following on from and echoing the custom drawn typeface and logo, we designed a bold geometric pattern which became the literal foundation for the shop-fit — a handpainted tiled floor provides a grid within which the modular cubic display plinths are placed.

The shop space has been designed to have high visual impact, whilst also providing a very functional framework to display a large cross section of products. To reflect the merchandise, quality of production has been key to the approach, from a hand painted sign and interiors, thermographically printed stationery and hand bound brochures to the custom made canvas carrier bags.

Two years in, the online shop has become a big focus of the business, with an ongoing evolution of the website from its initial editorial style to a comprehensive product led e-commerce site.
darkroomlondon.com

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The Uniform Studio 2009

Branding

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The Uniform Studio create and produce 'bespoke uniforms' for many high-end retail and hospitality clients, and it was the seemingly oxymoronic nature of this pairing of words that inspired our design of their identity. The aim was to give at first glance a look of overall uniformity, but on closer inspection it becomes apparent that a different typeface is used for each line of text – subtly hinting at the nature of bespoke garments, and the attention to detail inherent in the tailor's craft.

theuniformstudio.com

Index of projects

Parlour Culture 2009>

Branding / Invitations

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A series of networking salon style events presented by a collective of arts producers, Parlour Culture had the aim of encouraging intellectual cross-pollination and the exchange of ideas between people working in the creative and cultural sector.

Our custom-drawn logo harks back to intellectual styles of the early 20th century, but that also feels contemporary, bold and cutting edge. The half-infilled vowels create metaphors of elements combining, and the letter U resembles a glass of red wine — a nod towards to the relaxed, social feel of the event.

The completely hand-made invitation took advantage of the short run of 30. A thick board was bound with pale green bookbinders linen to create a heavy A5 tablet. The design was hand blocked in glossy black foil to give maximum contrast against the soft cloth base. A different coloured linen cloth was used for each of the series' invitations.

Index of projects

Constructive Lives 2008

Branding / Retail / Interiors

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Constructive Lives is a West London shop selling furniture and interior accessories. Initially approached to design just the visual identity, we proposed to the owners that we take on the entire art direction of the shop including the interior design and fit-out, the external cladding and all the printed and online requirements.

Our concept was led very much by the shop's location on Portobello road — an area with a diverse cultural community and strong and vibrant visual identity, the shop premises which had a large external wall, and the owners mixed Irish, African and West Indian heritage.

Taking the geometric wall murals of the Ndebele community of South Africa as a starting point we created our own contemporary version in ceramic tiles for the large exterior wall of the shop. With the pattern itself being so striking, the typographic element of the identity had to be quite understated so as not to clash.

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Skin + Bones, Somerset House 2008

Exhibition Graphics / Branding

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Multistorey was commissioned by Somerset House to design the graphic elements for Skin + Bones, an exhibition investigating and celebrating how fashion and architecture have influenced and informed each other since the 1980s. Our custom drawn typeface explores this idea and echoes the processes, materials and concepts of each industry, the materials of pin-and-thread illustrations being both structural and tactile, hard edged and elegant, precise and fluid.

Due to the dark environment required for the exhibits, internal graphics and labelling would be very hard to read so we kept them to a minimum, providing a 120 page illustrated guide for the visitor to work alongside very simple caption labels. They could then take these away with them for future reference.

Alongside the exhibition graphics we designed all the marketing matererial including invitations, posters, banners and advertisements.

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Branding / Packaging

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Multistorey were asked to re-brand a (now sadly defunct) London florist. We found something charmingly anachronistic about the word 'modern', and felt it would make an interesting starting point — using historical reference points, and exploring what was 'modern' to previous generations of florists. In this way, we could avoid producing a modern rebrand that would date very quickly...

Using 1950s style white trellis as the structural foundation, we then quite literally grew type around it like vines. We also created windows or shards within the trellis patterns to hold secondary type. The contrasts between sugared almond pink, grass green, and the harder and softer elements of the designs allowed for a treatment that wasn't overtly feminine, it is men after all who are supposed to be the bigger buyer of flowers.

A large suite of stationery was implemented, each item with a specific trellis shape. One of the more interesting pieces is the bespoke carrier bags whose cord handles actually weave in and out of the printed trellis. The wrapping paper is printed with more abstracted patterns, wrapped and tied with ribbon printed with a continuous vine.

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Nokia Prism Series

Art Direction

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Multistorey were asked by Nokia to design the world-wide marketing brochures for the Prism Collection — a range of fashion-led mobile phones. Nokia's industrial design team had been influenced by such diverse inspirations as geometric and symmetrical architecture, faceted jewel-like motifs, and cheap home-made angular post-punk graphics. To visually discuss these things we built a small triangular box lined with optical quality mirrors.

We wanted the shoot to be as honest as possible, but to create optical alchemy by turning our cheap and raw props — telephone-cable keyrings, drawing tools, light bulbs and handmade approximations of the handset's keypad and screensavers — into infinite and beautiful sci-fi landscapes when placed within the reflective set.

The brochure itself was laid out as one long strip and pages were french-folded (and printed with solid fluros on the reverse) to enhance this wrap-around effect. The centre spread of the brochure is folded like a pop-up book along the angular lines of the keypad. The typographic headlines were made from hand cut and folded paper, photographed and overlaid on the geometric images to increase the level of 3-dimensionality. The brochures are printed on high gloss card and bound with electric blue tape creating a very tactile experience.

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Super Design Market 2007

Exhibition Graphics / Branding

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The second Super Design Market was held in the Royal Festival Hall as part of the London Design Festival. 30 product designers were invited by Scarlet Projects to take part and have the opportunity to sell their work direct to the public. Our main objective was to create an impact and to draw attention to the show — one of many events taking place within the foyer's huge open space that weekend. Using the concrete pillars we wrapped and knotted hundreds of meters of fabric to create a canopy above the market that could be seen from anywhere in the space. Beneath this canopy, exhibition designer Mark Garside installed a set of oversize black cardboard tubes that acted as plinths for the products to be displayed on and interspersed these with taller tubes that we could use for signage and information graphics.

Our main signage was made from coloured upholstery foam cut into oversize letters that were loosely stacked up to create our logo. We also produced leaflets and badges for each designer and their wares.

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Re-Bag 2007

Bag Design

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Re-Bag was a project curated and produced by Progress Packaging. 15 design companies were asked to come up with a design to be printed on a canvas bag. The brief was to promote the idea of re-using the bag, so we devised a way that a simple canvas bag could also be used as both a chic evening bag and a smart handbag, so doubling its potential usage. We photographed our favourite two bags and had them printed onto the canvas bag and its handles, creating a trompe l'oeil effect. Ours was the top seller of the project, selling out two print runs.

progresspackaging.co.uk

Index of projects

Lyric Theatre Hammersmith 2006

Branding / Art Direction / Marketing Material / Signage

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When rebranding this vibrant West London theatre, we aimed to describe its complex energy and personality, to give it a unique visual personality — as a restless and curious mind, willing to explore all genres and aspects of the stage. It became apparent to us that the identity shouldn't be created on a computer, so we developed a hand written system to become both the signature logo and the general voice of its presentations. The idiosyncrasies inherent in the mark making of spontaneous handwriting are key to the personality of the Lyric. It also allowed us to create titles that talk specifically about a production, so for example, we might use harshly scrawled upper case lettering for a politically charged play or perhaps a looser, more rounded script for something that has a softer, more melancholic theme.

Our three years as the Lyric's art directors saw us designing or overseeing all marketing material including seasonal brochures, posters, fliers, advertisements and website, as well as creating a signage and decorative system. We quite literally scrawled all over the building and promotional material with playful script and drawings, creating the feeling to the the visitor that they have just walked into the lifesize visualisation of a creative sketchbook, full of notes and ideas.

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AV Festival 2006 / 2008

Branding / Art Direction / Copywriting

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AV Festival is the UK’s largest digital arts festival, and takes place in the cities of Newcastle/Gateshead, Sunderland and Middlesbrough. The brief for the 2006 branding exercise and marketing campaign was to widen appeal much further than the “die-hard digital geeks”. The identity needed to work as a flexible system, updatable by multiple agencies for each subsequent year, theme and graphic concept.

The 2006 theme was inspired by the North East’s biotechnology industries. We jumped headfirst into the tabloid style scare-mongering of such issues by creating provocative, intriguing and absurd statements, each referring to its host marketing material as a living being — the posters were clones of real posters, the guidebook was genetically modified to be 150% more useful, the adverts had been tested on animals.

To introduce the 2008 theme of Broadcast, we experimented with patterns that describe radiowaves and transmissive signals, and this time our statements used the language of telecommunications to discuss the potential of the visitors as being both the transmitter and the receiver of broadcasts. Work for each festival included outdoor and press campaigns, screen idents, art direction of website and a 52 page A5 festival guide book.

Index of projects

Design London, Milan 2005

Exhibition / Branding

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Design London was an exhibition held as part of the Milan Furniture Fair in 2005. Over 70 British product and furniture designers exhibited in an 800m2 space, each of them represented by one of five British organisations. Our aim was to capture the vibrancy of the London design community and to set it apart from the slick commercialism of the Fair.

Electrical circuits were used as visual metaphors to describe the various links between the exhibiting organisations and designers, and as a navigational aid for both the space and the printed material. To create a flexible and fluid system, we commissioned London-based illustrator Marcus James to hand draw the electrical components, connectors and cabling involved. These formed the basis of all the exhibition graphics including a 6x4m information wall, A5 information cards for each designer and a 40 page A6 exhibition brochure.

Reinforcing the graphic system, tangled electrical cables cut from colour-coded vinyl created pathways on the floor of the exhibition space between each exhibitor's plinth and the main hub information desk. The distinctive UK three-pin electrical plug was a key detail in our concept and the main overhead signage was constructed from six-socket extension leads wired together into grids, with dot-matrix text made from plug-in children's glowlights. We also produced die-cut beermats in the shape of plug sockets for use as flyers.

The exhibition's structural and spatial elements were designed by Frank.

Index of projects

Philip Kingsley 2005>

Branding / Packaging

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Philip Kingsley opened his Trichology clinic 20 years ago. For the past 10 years, he has sold a range of treatment products from his London and New York clinics. Multistorey were approached to re-brand and package his entire range of 35 products, with the aim of establishing the brand in salons and outlets outside their own clinics.

The logo consists of a specially drawn typeface which incorporates a K made from lines that resemble hair. The packaging design was kept simple and clean and easily navigable, as the existing client base ranges from very young to elderly people. Colour coding helps to define product grouping and also correlates to colours used in the original packaging to avoid confusion, although we selected a new set of hues within each colour palette to freshen the range. The boxes are made from a pearlescent stock, evocative of the clean, shiny appearance of healthy hair.

Index of projects

Marks & Spender Lifestore 2005

Packaging

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We designed the entire packaging range for the household storage department of Marks & Spencer's Lifestore. Our aim was to introduce an element of fun to the more mundane domestic purchases. The basic concept uses hundreds of coloured polypropelene swingtags, taking the form of whatever would normally be stored in that particular item, e.g. a CD shape for a CD rack, a T-shirt shape for a laundry basket. There were also 50+ box designs and stickers for pre-packed items. Detail is key to the design ­— brass rivets and black thread for swing tags, and our complex illustrations for boxed items.

Initially designed for the Lifestore, the packaging was then rolled out into stores across the UK.

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Thomas Burberry 2003 / 2004

Art Direction

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Barnaby Roper's photographs for the Burberry diffusion line's autumn/winter brochure perfectly captured a blustery English autumn day at the seaside. Each page is a different size, to feel like one of the protagonists had hastily bundled together a scrap-book of beachcombings and photographs from their trip. The stock used is an oatmeal coloured card with visible flecks of darker fibre, which appear to be being blown around in the photographs. The black borders and off-white paper stock add to a feeling of timelessness.

For the Autumn/Winter 04/05 brochure we again tried to capture a feeling of a personal collection of photographs. This time we created a huge collage of Barnaby Roper's photos and used detail shots from it as each of the brochure's spreads. A photograph of the entire collage was printed as a poster and inserted into each copy. To complement the brochure we created press ads, instore posters and an instore/online short film for the collection.

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